Companies Grow Best In A Sweet-Smelling Culture | Jack Daly

I tell my audiences every day that the key to success is taking action. Take a minute to look over this weeks featured articles and videos that highlight the different ways you might take action and have it positively benefit your bottom line.

People, companies grow best in a sweet-smelling culture

By Bonnie Sussman-Versace

Jack Daly, sales coach and trainer, frequently asks his audiences, “What does your company culture smell like? Does it smell sweet, or does it stink?”

When I first heard these questions, they seemed rather strange. In addition, what does Daly’s message about creating unique and sustainable sales techniques and opportunities have to do with a company’s culture?

The reality is that it has everything to do with it. The how, what, where, when, why, how much and by whom of sales start with the culture and all the human senses that are driven by the culture. What does it look like, sound like, feel like, and – to Daly’s point – smell like?

When a company culture stinks, it negatively affects the perception of how customers, employees, vendors and the community perceive the company. Because a person’s perception is his or her reality, it also means that the opposite is true – those same groups of people will be inspired to do business with, or be connected to, a company whose culture is fragrant (healthy).

If we want people to have the best perceptions about our company, we need to make sure the culture is on rock-solid ground and smells as refreshing as a spring rain.

Think about the message customers receive when they walk into a business 11 minutes before the published closing time and are greeted by a less than genuinely interested representative of the company.

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Upcoming Educational Opportunities: Full 2015 Workshop Schedule

Sep 16, 2015- Nashville, TN
Exceptional Entrepreneur Hyper Growth Bootcamp

Sep 25, 2015- Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Smart Selling Workshop – Fort Lauderdale, FL

Oct 2, 2015- Cincinnati, Ohio
Smart Selling Workshop – Cincinnati, OH

Oct 6, 2015- San Antonio, TX
Smart Selling Workshop – San Antonio, TX

Oct 9, 2015- Atlanta, Georgia
Smart Selling Workshop – Atlanta, GA

For all registration questions, please contact Gabriel Clift at Gabriel@jackdaly.net

Australia November 2015

    Building a World Class Sales Organisation Workshops (Management)

  • Auckland-Tuesday 3 November
  • Brisbane-Thursday 5 November
  • Melbourne -9 November 2015
  • Sydney- Wednesday 11 November
  • Winning Sales Strategies Workshops (Sales)

  • Auckland- Wednesday, 4 November
  • Brisbane – Friday, 6 November
  • Melbourne -Tuesday 10 November
  • Sydney – Thursday 12 November

For all registration questions, please contact Sean Scott at sean@thegrowthfaculty.com.au


What else? Who else? What’s bigger than that?

By Caryn Kopp

Maximizing relationships means you find ways to get new dollars from existing clients. Generally speaking, you want to work to increase your share of sale with your clients that may need more from you. You want to purposefully work toward getting a bigger “piece of the pie.” This will get you closer to a 100-percent share of sale.

If at all possible, you also want to think of creative ways to grow the overall pie. One of my clients, “Tom,” owned a business that monograms T-shirts and other items. He was working with a large client company. “ClientCo” had almost 100 different decision makers with budgets, and Tom knew one of them. I knew immediately that my job was to help him get in front of the other 99.

The decision maker that Tom had built a relationship with purchased about 50 T-shirts for a charity walk his department was sponsoring. So I asked Tom the key questions: What else? Who else? What’s bigger than that? What else could he sell this decision maker, and who else might want to buy these T-shirts? After all, ClientCo had 20,000 employees. A sale of 50 T-shirts was just scratching the surface.

Tom thought about the questions. He knew of a second charity walk that the department was sponsoring later in the year that would more than double the order. We talked more and decided also to offer water bottles and key chains T-shirts. I continued to ask Tom for more possibilities until he was stumped.

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Model the Masters | Jack Daly Caddie Life Lessons


Yes!, please and thank you

by Seth Godin

Don’t jerk people around

Here’s a simple marketing strategy for a smaller company trying to compete in a big-company world: Choose your customers, trust them, treat them well.

Say yes.

Bend the rules.

Show up on time.

Keep your promises.

Don’t exert power merely because you can.

Be human, be kind, pay attention, smile.

Not everyone deserves this sort of treatment, not everyone will do their part to be the kind of customer you can delight and serve. But that’s okay, you don’t need everyone.

When in doubt, be the anti-airline.

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